Bypest London Pest Control Services – helping you get rid of Residential Pest problems

If you have a problem with pest control, we can help. We cover both commercial and residential pest management. Our technicians know what is needed for successful, effective Pest Control.

We offer a free site survey to assess what is needed and formulate a plan especially to deal with your issue, providing you with a quotation for the work.

Our cost-effective service can tackle pest control and prevention on any scale – whether it’s a wasp nest at your home or an environmental issue at a large business.

Our staff can help with any enquiry, even if you are not sure of the type of pest or the scale of the problem.  As well as pest extermination and control, we provide rodent and insect proofing to make sure your home or business remains pest free.

No-fuss pest extermination

Our discreet and professional service means you are in good hands.

At Bypest, we always:

• Use approved and tested pesticides when needed

• Comply with all health and safety standards and legislation

• Conduct comprehensive risk assessments

• Maintain the highest level of training and understanding across our fully-qualified staff

Pest Control Services

We value customer service and all enquiries to Bypest are answered within two hours. Our complete service includes assessment, treatment and prevention of London Pest Control issues.

Below are the main types of pest that our technicians deal with.

Rats Control  

Signs that you may have a rat infestation include seeing holes, droppings, or notice the damage caused by chewing. Rats are nocturnal, so you won’t necessarily see the rats themselves. Common types of rat that you may have a problem with include the Norway rat and the ship rat. We have the expertise to deal with Rats Control, however big the problem is.

Mice Control

Mice will often cause lots of damage, nibbling on and spoiling food, and leaving urine and droppings. Like many pests, mice are unhygienic and can pass on disease, so it’s particularly important to take mice control seriously at a place of business.

Mice will often nest in undisturbed parts of a home or building. Our knowledgeable technicians know how to find and treat a mice infestation.

Cockroaches Control

The presence of cockroaches can cause terrible damage to a business’s reputation, let alone the actual damage they cause and potential to spread disease.

If you have a problem with cockroaches, call us at Bypest. We understand their behaviour, where they are likely to be nesting, and how to deal with them.

Wasps Control

Wasps can be aggressive and sting and any wasp infestation or nest should always be treated with caution. Different species of wasps will act in different ways.

Wasps will often nest in bushes, lofts and wall cavities. Never try to block up a hole if you think it leads to a nest, and never remove the nest yourself. Our fully qualified technicians can safely remove wasps nests from your home or business.

Flies Control

Flies are an unsanitary pest as they spread disease by moving from rotting food, to rubbish, to food and cutlery that are exposed.

We are all used to seeing flies around seasonally, but a professional pest control company should be used for larger infestations.

Fleas Control

Fleas lay their eggs in carpets, on our pets, and even on bedding and clothing. Warm homes provide a perfect temperature for them to breed.

Signs of a flea problem include your pet scratching itself and noticing tiny specks of dirt that are flea faeces. Fleas can also bite people, causing itchy and irritated skin.

Our effective flea control considers not just your pet but how fleas live in the home and how to remove them for good.

Moths Control

Moths can cause a lot of damage during the larval stage. Larvae may have been carried into your home or business via clothing, food or furniture.

At Bypest, we can asses any moth issue you have. We will locate the source of the problem and remove it.

Bedbugs Control

Often the sign of a bedbug problem is seeing their skin or their droppings. We can tackle bedbug problems with our safe, integrated bedbugs removal service.

If you are concerned about a possible bedbug infestation, give us a call. We provide professional bedbugs fumigation for hotels and bed and breakfasts in London and the M25. We can also help with bedbug prevention measures.

Pigeons Control

Pigeons are a nuisance with their droppings, noise and, as pigeons can pass on disease to humans, are seen as an unhygienic blight.

If you have a pigeon or avian problem at your business or home, Bypest can help. Our pigeon prevention measures include wires, spikes and netting to stop pigeons gathering and fouling at your business premises.

Ants Control

We can assess and advise on an ant a problem at your home or business, including the removal of nests. Sometimes adjoining buildings will need to be treated, our fully qualified staff can advise on this.

Using effective methods, we can eliminate ant colonies and deter ants from nesting in your building.

Squirrels Control

A squirrel nest can be found in lofts, voids and wall cavities. Like rats, squirrels will gnaw and can cause damage to buildings.

Unlike the red squirrel, the grey squirrel is prevalent in the UK and is not a protected species. Our fully qualified team can remove squirrels from lofts and buildings and advise on prevention measures.

Bypest London Pest Control Company  offers a Comprehensive Pest Control Services for all kind of Pest Control Problems throughout London and around M25 Area.

Keeping household pests as pets

Rats, cockroaches, ants and wasps might be household pests to many of us, but to a group of enthusiasts, they are liked, if not loved, as pets.

Perhaps the easiest pest pet to relate to is the rat. In the wild, these rodents are dark, dirty and riddled with germs. But varieties have been bred which, to some, are attractive to look at and can be taught some simple behaviours.

The Norway rat is a pest across the whole of the UK, and indeed much of the world. Highly adaptable and quite intelligent, it often lives off the waste that we humans create. Rats are extremely social animals, preferring to live in colonies where they also breed very quickly.

It’s the intelligence and social qualities of rats which some believe make them ideal as pets. They can be friendly animals, responding well to attention, and enjoying the company of their owners.

But while they might be much cleaner than their wild relatives, they share the same traits. Rats can be extremely destructive, chewing their way through many materials. They’re also nocturnal, preferring to be active in darkness, and they don’t live for very long.

Insect pests can also be a form of pet

Cockroaches, ants and even wasps are bred in captivity, either by insect-lovers or as a source of food for other creatures.

This is sometimes the fate of cockroaches, which can be kept as live food for reptiles. Cockroaches are chosen because they are very easy to breed and will eat almost anything.

Not all species of cockroach are thought of as a pest and some of the more exotic varieties are kept as pets in their own right. Madagascan hissing cockroaches are popular because they make a noise, while giant cockroaches make for a curiosity.

Every cockroach breeder, particularly those keeping the common German cockroach as reptile food, must take care that the creatures don’t escape. Outside a controlled environment, their rapid breeding cycle and adaptability can quickly create a pest control problem.

Ants and wasps as pets not pests

Many people are fascinated by the complex structures and societies built by social insects such as ants and wasps. As a result, some choose to keep them in captivity, to see how they live.

No insect display in a zoo seems complete without a colony of leaf-cutter ants, who slice up vegetation and carry impossibly large pieces back to their nest. Many ant farms kept in homes are less ambitious, with the highlight being the view of the complex web of tunnels, exposed by their being kept in slim glass-sided tanks.

Not surprisingly, keeping wasps as pets is much more unusual. It requires a lot of space and strong nerves, but these requirements don’t deter a dedicated bunch of enthusiasts. They venture out to find young nests in the spring, and relocate them to a purpose-built enclosure. Here the wasps have space to fly, and are supplied with a steady source of food.

Despite their captivity, the danger of these pets becoming pests never goes away. The creatures are always looking for food, and will exploit every opportunity to escape. It doesn’t take much for pet control to become pest control.

Do Rats hibernate during the Winter?

You might think that pest control work quietens down during the winter, because quite a few nuisance animals and insects go into hibernation.

But lots of household pests, including rats and mice, remain active all year round. The longer and colder winter nights make your home, garden and workplace more attractive to these rodents, who are always looking for food, and for somewhere warm and dry to nest.

Wasps and other insect pests might become almost invisible during the winter months, but they’re simply dormant and will be back next spring. Colder weather gives you a chance to deal with holes and gaps where they may have nested this year, helping prevent their return.

Pest control during the winter months

Taking action to prevent rats and other pests is as important during the winter as at any other time of year. The most basic precautions include not leaving any food outdoors overnight, and keeping food preparation and storage areas clean and tidy.

Leftover pet food or food spillages, indoors or out, are hugely attractive to rats and mice looking for something to eat.

Another simple pest control task is to tidy up your garden or other outdoor area. Piles of wood or dry leaves can quickly become comfortable homes for rodents. Compost bins are particularly popular, especially if you put food scraps into them.

Outbuildings, such as sheds and children’s playhouses, can also become places of safety for rats and mice. Here they can live undisturbed for weeks at a time, protected from the extremes of the British winter climate. Make it part of your winter routine to check these buildings, and to fill any obvious cracks or gaps through which rodents could get in.

Indoor pests thrive during the winter

Fleas, moths and bedbugs are common indoor pests that don’t pay much attention to what the weather’s doing outside. Whatever the time of year, they continue breeding and spreading themselves around your home or workplace.

The cooler temperatures slow down their reproduction, but our centrally-heated buildings protect them from the cold. Because they live off us and our pets, fleas and bedbugs have more opportunity to spread during the winter, as we spend more time indoors.

Cockroaches, the scourge of many kitchens, also continue to be active during the winter months. In the event that they find themselves short of food, they can, like many pests, survive for a long time on virtually nothing.

Many people think that because pests are not seen so often during the winter, they are less of a problem. Some even believe that rats and mice do hibernate. But experienced pest controllers know that winter is as busy a time of year as any, and that it’s also a good time to act to prevent more serious pest issues from occurring in the spring.

I Bury Those Cock-A-Roaches – Anyone for cockroach chicken?

This story happened to me when I was first employed as a pest control officer working for a London borough council. I obviously had no qualms about the fact I was going to see some fairly disgusting stuff, like dead rats and filthy houses, but nothing could quite prepare me for the shock of one of my first jobs. What happened was beyond anything I could have possibly expected.

We were out on a job and the boss told me that we were going to see a house that was particularly bad. He told me to prepare myself to be a bit shocked, because as Cockroach Infestations go, this apparently was a totally over-run property. He’d already been and had a go at the roaches, but his previous efforts had done little to rid the house of these pests.

Usually smaller cockroach infestations can be sorted out with a good dose of insecticide. As these creatures like to eat their own excrement, it can be very easy to get insecticide baits into a cockroach community, and then all you have to do is wait for them to die.

After arriving at the block of flats and walking up the standard smelly staircase, we arrived at the door of the flat. A few loud knocks later and we were standing eye to eye with a middle aged Jamaican lady who greeted us in a thick patois. She was glad to see us and all that and invited us in.

When I entered the house, I’d never seen filth like it, but the whole place seemed devoid of the cockroaches we’d come to destroy. I asked the boss what the problem was, because I couldn’t see any of the filthy insects. He pointed to a corner of wall-paper that was slightly unstuck and told me to peel it away from the wall.

When I pulled back the piece of wall-paper I almost jumped out of my skin. Hundreds of the little brown-black horrors fell to the floor, as if they were the only thing left that was holding the wall-paper up. Apparently cockroaches are literally suckers for wall-paper paste. They love eating it and had got behind almost every bit of wall-paper in the house.

The boss got on with the business of laying down the poison and I decided to go and have a look round the house to see how far the roaches had got. Every room I looked in was covered in rubbish. It was no wonder the house had become some kind of safe haven for half of East London’s roach population, the place was a right old pit.

I decided to go into one of the rooms, which looked like the lounge. I espied some half eaten chicken on the floor, which was crawling with roaches. I couldn’t believe my eyes. I looked around and was certain that there was no one in the room, as the sofa was covered in rubbish and walked towards the chicken, in order to get a better look.

As I got to the plate of food I bent over to get a closer look at the roaches, when I suddenly heard a noise from behind me that made me literally jump out of my skin. I looked round and an old guy had emerged from the rubbish on the sofa and sat up. I’d not even seen him there underneath the pile of filth.

He seemed incredibly unhappy with me and accused me of trying to steal his half eaten chicken. I was so shocked by the incident it was all I could was mumble a quick apology and leave the room. As I got through the doorway to go back and see the boss I realised I’d literally come out in a cold sweat. He looked me up and down and commented on the fact that I looked a bit pale and joked that maybe I’d seen a monster roach. In my mind I had seen something almost as bad. It was the first time I’d got a bit of a shock in my new profession as a pest control agent, and somehow I didn’t feel it would be my last.

Are most autumn Wasps male or female?

Whether most autumn wasps are male or female does not really make much difference to your frustrating experience with these insects at this time of year. The autumn months are when wasps can become a persistent nuisance and are more inclined to use their tiny but painful stings.

Most of the wasps you’ll see buzzing around in the autumn are female or worker wasps. Over the year, hundreds, if not thousands, have emerged from their papery grey nests to join the growing crowd that serve their queen. Their job is to gather food, usually in the form of other insects, and help to make the nest larger.

By the end of the summer, the next generation of queens will have left, looking for mates and then for somewhere to hibernate through the winter. This leaves huge numbers of infertile female worker wasps with no real work to do. That’s when they become particularly irritating pests.

The roles of male and female wasps

Most of the eggs laid by a queen wasp become female workers. It’s only towards the end of summer when some develop into males and others into young queens. All of these will leave the nest when fully developed, going in search of mates from other wasp nests.

Having mated with a queen, the male wasps die. The fertilised new queens go looking for somewhere to spend the winter, where they will not be disturbed. This hibernation period is also when they are most vulnerable. If you come across a hibernating queen wasp, perhaps in a shed or loft space, it should be easy to kill. However, if you have any concerns about it, contact a Wasps Pest Control specialist.

As spring arrives, the warmer weather wakes the queen, who will go in search of a suitable place for her nest. This could be a hole in a tree or building, a sheltered spot inside a hedge, or some other location it considers safe enough to start constructing a nest.

The first eggs it lays will grow into infertile female wasps, the workers, who take over responsibility for extending the nest and gathering food while the queen continues to lay eggs.

Female wasps are the pest control problem

By the autumn, the wasp nest is probably home to thousands of insects. It becomes overcrowded, as building stops, and the temperature inside the nest rises. The worker wasps continue to collect food but once the queens and male wasps have left, there are fewer wasp grubs to feed.

The workers become overfed and overheated in their crowded nest. Sometimes they are tipsy from eating over-ripe fruit. It’s often these hot, bothered wasps who turn up uninvited at picnics and barbecues or come into your home, searching for sweetness to feed on. They become easily irritated and angry, and will often sting with little provocation.

While they are at their worst in the autumn, wasps can be a pest control problem at any time of year. They are best dealt with in the early summer, when the nests are smaller and the male wasps and young queens have yet to hatch.

If you need to deal with wasps in the autumn, it is usually better to call in a professional pest controller. They will have all the necessary protective equipment and expertise to remove the nest completely and efficiently.

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